Tag Archives: photography

Jack Frost nipping at our heels!

 

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Moving from the city to the country; early morning frosts brings back childhood memories.

Winter arrives with the icy fingers of frost and heavy fog in abundance. Jack Frost is laying claim on our wide open spaces with great delight, as temperatures dive down to minus zero Celsius. The appearance of snow on the nearby mountain peaks, has brought the best ski season in five years attracting visitors and tourist dollars to the region.

I began this post at the start of winter and here it is with only one day officially before the start of spring. Life and other distractions have kept me away from finishing this blog about my tree-change during the cold months. My blogging was focused on Creativity and Innovation,  my latest university unit towards my agonizingly slow process of getting my first degree.

It has been an exceptionally cold winter. The wood heater is working overtime and the woolly jumpers and fur-lined boots busted out of the wardrobe. My two furry friends, Friskie and Rambo, have increased the snuggle factor as the temperature gauge drops overnight.

My respite from the cold was a two week trip to East Timor (Timor Leste) in July with a local friends group of 16 which included eight secondary college students, teachers and community members such as myself.  This was a life-changing trip and has increased my passion for this emerging nation and its beautiful people to do more to support them. I will post separately about my travels to Timor Leste and share my observations and experiences. The morning I flew out to 30 degrees plus temperatures, it was minus 5 at home! Very cold by Australian standards.

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Our frozen landscape!

With the cold weather, also came a wet winter. Many of us thought that last year’s big wet after almost 10 years of dry weather was  a one-off and not to be complacent that the same would happen again. Obviously, we were optimistic when we bought our 22,000 litre water tank to catch the run off on our shed in April – it is now full. Both our dams have filled as well which is a bonus. Bolly (my hubby) continues to clear up around the place and is making some significant inroads. Where he has cleared the banking between the dams, is now a clearway for visiting kangaroos. We do see some big holes which belong to our burrowing wombats but not near the house thankfully. Rabbits were also on the increase but their numbers seem to have tapered off. My city cat, Rambo, caught his first rabbit the other day and his second one the next day. We are not sure if it was the same rabbit or not! Not bad for a 11-year-old cat who sleeps most of the day.

Sadly, we had to have one of our old cows put down recently. The extra cold mornings and the deterioration in her health, meant that it was the most humane thing to do. The other two despite their slow movements are happy munching grass and treating us with the contempt they think we deserve.

Although the chilly days bring their challenges to keeping well rugged-up and warm, the landscape is always changing and giving us new vistas each day. But seeing the early daffodils nodding in the breeze gives one hope of warmer days ahead.

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Oh daffodil your arrival not only brightens my garden but gives a promise of spring to come.

 

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The business of innovation – for richer or poorer

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Innovation is another one of those terms that gets tossed around frequently, but do we really take the time to think more deeply about what it means? We all strive to be more  innovative; whether it is to make a difference in the world or come up with a product or a service for a ready-made market. This week I received my regular cosmetics’ brochure and there were at least six or more new beauty products all boasting innovations.  From the small to the big things, innovation can cover a multitude of uses. We are also told there is a difference between being creative and innovative.

 

It is easy to become enraptured by the ‘big guns’ such as Tesla with its driverless electric cars or Virgin with plans for holiday space trips to Mars; and neglect the quiet achievers. Innovation surrounds us everywhere and we probably take many inventions and other activities for granted.

I have just finished watching the final episode of the SBS TV series Michael Mosley: Queen Victoria’s Slums (2017) which involved  families and individuals living the life that their ancestors did as slum dwellers in London’s East End during her reign. The reality of life for the poorest of the poor becomes evident very quickly. One has to admire the ingenuity and survival skills living in the slums required. The final show moved onto the new age following the death of Queen Victoria, and the attempts to introduce welfare reform. Among these was a mass clearance of slums. While some people remained at the bottom of the rung others managed to work their way outside of the slums for a better life. Due to exposure in local newspapers with photographs and stories highlighting the dire circumstances of many individuals living in poverty, there was a more acute awareness among those with the power to change things.

With the rise of trade unions for better conditions and pay for working men, the women’s right to vote movement, and cooperatives which supported families, innovations were coming to the fore as part of a more progressive society. One example, the cooperative store provided a range of quality goods at competitive prices to consumers as well as social support. There were free first-time outings to the countryside away from the squalid city conditions for cooperative members and their children.

While poverty has not been eradicated with many disadvantaged groups still struggling today, the introduction of social security payments and subsidised medical treatment offers safety nets for those who need financial assistance in Australia. Innovative thinking was behind welfare reform but as we face different challenges and changing needs of the population, innovation is required again to avoid entrenched poverty becoming the norm.

 

https://www.sbs.com.au/ondemand/video/1010612291769/michael-mosley-queen-victorias-slum-the-fledgling-welfare-system

 

 

First-month reflections

Our lives have changed but for good as I reflect on the first few weeks of our permanent tree change. But don’t mistake this comment as meaning everything is perfect. As with any change, it’s like learning to wear a different suit of clothing that may need some adjustments here and there.

Bolly (husband and life-partner) says he is working harder in retirement than in his previous employment! But he is enthusiastic about his new adventure and tells people he is loving it. This property needs a little bit of attention and there is no shortage of projects and tasks to be done.

For me, a move back to the country was always my dream. My life as a naive country girl to city dweller has shaped and moulded my outlook on the world and my place in it. As I unpack my life contained in countless boxes of stuff collected over four decades, I am learning to let go and move on. Some things end up back in boxes and on shelves, while I bid farewell to others. It’s a gradual process. My husband was concerned that unpacking boxes and finding homes for our possessions was not a mentally stimulating task for me; knowing all the other grand plans and activities I want to pursue. But creating order and spaces to fulfill my ideas and vision for this place is a priority for this procrastination-inclined individual.

Daily accomplishments vary from small to large. Turning a house into a home has required some effort and will be on-going for some time yet. Memories of cold, frosty mornings have been replaced with dry, hot summer days. Outside jobs have taken priority to make sure we are “fire ready”. Removing leaf litter, cleaning gutters on both the house and shed,  checking the fire-fighting pump at the dam and the various sprinklers around the house are now completed. We have also managed to paint some rooms which has provided an instant facelift.

We are becoming much more aware of the local wild life with visits from kangaroos, foxes, frogs and snakes. The frogs manage to find a way into the house but thankfully no snakes yet! We love the views across our valley and to the hills behind us; always conscious of the weather and its changing patterns. Watching the sun come up as it gradually spreads its light across the paddocks and dip down in the evenings is a joy.  When a full moon bursts forth from the nearby hill and I can watch it set in the early morning from my bedroom window, there’s a sense of magic. Cliche as it sounds, humans need to connect to nature; well this human being does!

When we are not communing with nature, we are doing battle with a large telecommunications giant to get internet connection installed. Because we are in a rural area it is a little bit more involved but the level of frustration and time wasted in the process is unbelievable.  Plenty of customers are venting their rage over the mismanagement of our new national broadband roll-out.

Trips into town are planned and an opportunity to treat ourselves to a lunch-time treat. Being a tourist town means there is no shortage of places to dine at so we are working our way through them. Got to try them all so we know where to take our visitors for the best experience. It is also an opportunity to get to know many of the local business people and join yet another loyalty program! We are slowly slotting into a new church community. While a smaller and more traditional church, we are getting to know people and feel warmly welcomed. Town gets busy on long weekends and school holidays so we are fortunate to live in such a peaceful spot.

We are meeting our neighbours in the shared drive-way and over the fence. The winter rains provided good feed for cattle producers and good prices for stock at the sales. Our property sits between two cattle farms of about 150 acres each. We are baby sitting three extremely elderly cows who seem content to see out their days here. Our two city-slicker cats seem to have accepted country life and continue to make an art-form out of sleeping.

 I’m trying to set a rountine which includes walking and writing everyday. The walk takes twice as long when you meet your neighbour driving down the laneway who stops for a yarn and writing gets put off because I keep seeing things that need to be done. But as my husband and I are discovering there will always be something that needs doing and we just have to ignore it if we want to enjoy doing other stuff. Each day is an adventure and there is a bit of Dora the Explorer in me!